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Bevacizumab Continuation Versus Treatment Holidays After First-Line Chemotherapy With Bevacizumab in Patients With Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: A Health Economic Analysis of a Randomized Phase 3 Trial (SAKK 41/06)

Published:March 30, 2016DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clcc.2016.03.002

      Abstract

      Background

      Bevacizumab (BEV)-containing therapies are costly. We performed a health economic analysis of a randomized phase 3 study (SAKK 41/06) that compared BEV continuation as a single agent (BEV) with treatment holidays (no BEV) after completing 4 to 6 cycles of first-line chemotherapy plus BEV in metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

      Patients and Methods

      Costs for first-line chemotherapy with BEV, BEV continuation therapy, hospitalizations (length of stay), control visits, diagnostic tests, and second-line and later rounds of chemotherapy were collected. Mean costs per patient per treatment arm and an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio were calculated. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was performed to account for uncertainty in the input parameters.

      Results

      The total incurred mean costs per patient were 126,631 Swiss francs (CHF) [95% confidence interval (CI), 116,521-136,740] for BEV versus CHF100,146 (95% CI, 92,811-107,481) for no BEV. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio was CHF108,991 per life-year gained (LYG; 95% CI from probabilistic sensitivity analysis, 62,890-248,515). Compared to a willingness-to-pay threshold of CHF100,000/LYG, there was 42% probability that BEV continuation was cost effective, which decreased to 20% at a threshold of CHF75,000/LYG. Economic equality was reached in only 0.07% of cases.

      Conclusion

      The clinical conclusion that BEV continuation as a single agent after completion of first-line chemotherapy is of low therapeutic value is supported by this health economic analysis. Costs increase without significant clinical benefit in this setting.

      Keywords

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