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Targeting Hyaluronic Acid and Peritoneal Dissemination in Colorectal Cancer

  • Faris Soliman
    Correspondence
    Address for correspondence: Faris Soliman, MBBCh MRCS Cardiff China Medical Research Unit, Henry Wellcome Building, University Hospital Wales, Cardiff, CF14 4XW, UK
    Affiliations
    Cardiff China Medical Research Collaborative, Division of Cancer and Genetics, School of Medicine, Cardiff University

    Cardiff and Vale University Health Board
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  • Lin Ye
    Affiliations
    Cardiff China Medical Research Collaborative, Division of Cancer and Genetics, School of Medicine, Cardiff University
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  • Wenguo Jiang
    Affiliations
    Cardiff China Medical Research Collaborative, Division of Cancer and Genetics, School of Medicine, Cardiff University
    Search for articles by this author
  • Rachel Hargest
    Affiliations
    Cardiff China Medical Research Collaborative, Division of Cancer and Genetics, School of Medicine, Cardiff University

    Cardiff and Vale University Health Board
    Search for articles by this author
Published:November 28, 2021DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clcc.2021.11.008

      Abstract

      Peritoneal metastasis (PM) from colorectal cancer (CRC) carries a significant mortality rate for patients and treatment is challenging. The development of PM is a multistep process involving detachment, adhesion, invasion and colonization of the peritoneal cavity. Cytoreductive surgery and HIPEC (hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy) for PM from CRC has some benefit but overall survival is poor and recurrence rates are high. Treatments to prevent the development of peritoneal metastasis could have the potential to improve CRC survival and disease-free outcomes.
      The ability of cancer cells to invade the peritoneum and become established as metastatic tumors is influenced by a multifactorial process. Hyaluronic acid (HA) has been shown to coat the mesothelial cells of the peritoneum and has been demonstrated to be utilized in various malignancies as part of the metastatic process in peritoneal dissemination. CD44, RHAMM (CD168) and ICAM-1 have all been shown to be binding partners for HA. Targeting HA-mediated binding may prevent adhesion to distant sites within the peritoneum through suppression of interaction of these molecules. Here we review the current literature and discuss key molecules involved with PM dissemination, with the potential to target these mechanisms in the delivery of future treatments.

      Keywords

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