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Clinical Updates for Colon Cancer Care in 2022

  • Jesus C. Fabregas
    Correspondence
    Address for correspondence: Jesus C Fabregas, MD, MPH, Department of Medicine, University of Florida, PO Box 100278, 1600 SW Archer Road, Gainesville, FL 32610.
    Affiliations
    Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology, University of Florida Health Cancer Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
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  • Brian Ramnaraign
    Affiliations
    Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology, University of Florida Health Cancer Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
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  • Thomas J. George
    Affiliations
    Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology, University of Florida Health Cancer Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
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      Abstract

      Colon cancer needs better screening and treatment options. Its incidence in the young population is rising. Recent changes in guidelines recommend beginning screening for colon cancer at the age of 45. Circulating tumor DNA presents an opportunity to select patients for administration of adjuvant chemotherapy. Immunotherapy is an option for patients with a deficiency in mismatch repair proteins. However, its efficacy outside of this group of patients remains a challenge. Targeted therapies such as BRAF inhibitors are an option for patients with poor prognosis, for whom cytotoxic chemotherapy is not as effective. This review presents the recently published evidence regarding screening and treating patients with colon cancer.

      Keywords

      Abbreviations:

      CC (Colon cancer), NSAIDS (Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), ctDNA (Circulating tumor DNA), dMMR (Deficient mismatch repair), MSI (Microsatellite instability), FOLFOX (5-Fluorouracil Oxaliplatin), CAPEOX (Capecitabine Oxaliplatin), FOLFIRI (5-fluorouracil irinotecan)
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